Propane gas is a very green and energy efficient fuel to use. People are increasingly turning to propane water heaters to take advantage of that. This article will review and price compare tank less propane water heaters, portable propane water heaters and traditional tank water heaters.

Eccotemp Systems portable tankless water heater

This is a portable tankless water heater that you can use and bring everywhere. Some of its uses are for outdoor work like washing boats and cars. You can use it for taking hot showers outdoors at the beach or lake house. It is also great for camping or if you have a cabin off the grid so to speak. This gives you instant hot water when you turn it on. There is no reservoir, so as long as the water is running it will be hot. It delivers 1 gallon of hot water per minute and has an adjustable water temperature from 80 degrees up to 150 degrees. It will fit any standardize garden hose style nozzle. This unit comes with a shower nozzle with an on-off control. It also includes hose and regulator to attach to a propane tank.
This Eccotemp Systems portable tankless water heater has a 4.5 star rating out of 5 with 28 customer reviews. For more information and reviews, please click here

Portable Tankless Water Heater with Shower Head
Endless hot water, in a FLASH! LP – powered Portable Tankless Water Heater. Hot water, instantly and exactly where you need it! Great for camping, cabin…
Rating: 4.5 / 5.0
Price: $129.50

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Propane Tankless Water Heaters
Also known as tankless on demand propane water heaters. This type of propane water heater has become very popular over the last few years? Why? Because they use less energy and will save you money on your propane bills in the long run. These units use about 50 percent less propane gas than a typical tank water heater. They will only burn gas when you use water on demand. With a typical tank water heater, even when you are not using it, the water must still be heated so it is hot when you finally use it. With an on demand propane water heater, it only goes on when you want hot water.
The best selling model at Amazon is the Bosch 1600H LP AquaStar 4.3 GPM Indoor Tankless Liquid Propane Water Heater. This unit can practically give you endless hot water. It delivers up to 4.3 gallons per minute. No more yelling at the hot water hog in the house anymore. This is compact and is lightweight so you can mount it on a wall for easy installation. This has a 3.5 star out of 5 rating on Amazon.

Bosch 1600H LP AquaStar 4.3 GPM Indoor Tankless Liquid Propane Water Heater
Bosch, 1 Major Appliance Or Shower At A Time, Hydro Ignition, LP Tankless Water Heater, Hydro Ignition Means No Standing Pilot Or Electricity Needed,…
Rating: 3.5 / 5.0
76% Buy This Item After Viewing It
Price: $652.06

Tankless water heaters are more expensive than a tank water heater, but will pay for itself in lower propane gas usage. Depending on the tankless model you purchase, you may qualify for a tax credit through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009. High efficient propane water heaters installed between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010 will be eligible for a tax credit. With water heaters, you can reclaim 30 percent of the installed cost and the credit goes up to $1,500. Not bad having Uncle Sam pay part of your new propane water heater.
Propane Tank Water Heaters
These are the traditional tank water heaters you have always seen. They have become much more energy efficient in recent years. A tank can typically be purchased from $350 and up. While your initial cost may be low, they are much more expensive in the long run to operate as compared to a tankless water heater. These models also qualify for the energy credit if they meet certain energy efficient ratings

RHEEM 50 Gallon FVR Propane Water Heater 6YR 22V50F1P

50 Gallons Flammable Vapor Ignition Resistant Propane Water Heater 6-year WarrantyFeatures:6-Year Limited Tank and Parts WarrantyOne-of-a-kind air/fuel…

$395.39

RHEEM 40 Gallon FVR Propane Water Heater 6YR 22V40F1P

40 Gallons Flammable Vapor Ignition Resistant Propane Water Heater 6-year WarrantyFeatures:6-Year Limited Tank and Parts WarrantyOne-of-a-kind air/fuel…

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The average residential propane price rose 6.2 cents per gallon to reach 246.6 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 14.9 cents per gallon compared to the same period last year. Wholesale propane prices increased 11.2 cents per gallon to reach 142.2 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 61.5 cents per gallon when compared to the December 29, 2008 price of 80.7 cents per gallon.

Propane Inventories Fall
Propane inventories in the U.S. fell by 1.5 million barrels last week to 52.5 million. The largest draw of 1.1 million barrels occurred in the Gulf Coast region. The Midwest regional stocks fell by 0.5 million barrels and the Rock Mountain/West Coast region drew slightly. The East Cost regional stocks built by 0.1 million barrels.

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Propane prices in Pennsylvania continue to climb. Prices jumped over 6 cents for residential customers. Propane prices at the wholesale level leapt almost 8.5 cents. Use this information when barginning with your propane supplier.

Propane Prices Pa

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The average residential propane price increased 4.8 cents per gallon to reach 240.3 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 7.3 cents per gallon compared to the same period last year. Current propane prices increased 6.2 cents per gallon to reach 131.0 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 45.7 cents per gallon when compared to the December 22, 2008 price of 85.3 cents per gallon.

Propane Inventories Draw Again
Total U.S. inventories of propane continued to decline last week, falling 3.4 million barrels to 54 million barrels. The Gulf Coast region drew 2.1 million barrels of propane stocks and the Midwest region declined 1.2 million barrels. The East Coast stocks dropped by 0.3 million barrels and the Rocky Mountain/West Coast region gained slightly.

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The average residential propane price increased 1.8 cents per gallon to reach 235.5 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 1.4 cents per gallon compared to the same period last year. Wholesale propane prices fell 3.6 cents per gallon to 124.8 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 45.8 cents per gallon when compared to the December 15, 2008 price of 79.0 cents per gallon.

Inventories of Propane Experience a Large Draw
Last week propane inventories experienced the largest weekly draw since February 2007, falling below the lower limit of the average range for the first time this year. Total U.S. inventories decreased 4.0 million barrels to 57.4 million barrels. The Gulf Coast regional stocks dropped 2.2 million barrels and the Midwest region declined 1.1 million barrels. The East Coast and Rocky Mountain/West Coast regions each drew 0.3 million barrels of inventory.

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The average residential propane price increased 4.6 cents per gallon to reach 233.8 cents per gallon. This was a decrease of 3.1 cents per gallon compared to the 236.9 cents per gallon average from the same period last year. Wholesale propane prices rose 5.6 cents per gallon, from 122.8 cents per gallon to 128.4 cents per gallon. This was an increase of 58.1 cents per gallon when compared to the December 8, 2008 price of 70.3 cents per gallon.

Propane Inventories  Continue to Draw
Over the past eight weeks, propane inventories have plummeted 11.5 million barrels from a level well above the average range to near the lower boundary of the average range. Total U.S. inventories of propane fell by 1.3 million barrels last week to 61.4 million barrels. The Midwest regional stocks experienced the largest decline of 0.8 million barrels. The Gulf Coast region drew by 0.4 million barrels and the Rocky Mountain/West Coast region fell by 0.1 million barrels. The East Coast regional inventories grew slightly.

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This is the last update from the Energy Information Agency for heating oil prices for the 2012-2013 season. Price updates will resume in October of 2013.

Home Heating Oil Quotes For the Week Ending March 18, 2013

Weekly Residential Propane Prices Heating Oil Prices
2/25/2013 3/4/2013 3/11/2013 3/18/2013
East Coast (PADD 1)
New England (PADD 1A)
Connecticut 4.137 4.154 4.198 4.225
Maine 3.759 3.798 3.817 3.885
Massachusetts 4.022 4.215 4.207 4.202
New Hampshire 3.869 3.896 3.917 3.987
Rhode Island 3.985 4.007 4.068 4.168
Vermont 3.828 3.894 3.913 3.981
Central Atlantic (PADD 1B)
Delaware 3.943 3.967 4.024 4.073
District of Columbia 4.537 4.594 4.593 4.638
Maryland 3.975 4.001 4.048 4.108
New Jersey 4.113 4.146 4.212 4.256
New York 4.274 4.302 4.342 4.392
Pennsylvania 3.774 3.813 3.879 3.953
Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C)
North Carolina 3.788 3.792 3.813 3.854
Virginia 3.732 3.737 3.767 3.812
Midwest (PADD 2)
Illinois
Indiana 3.586 3.615 3.739 3.799
Iowa 3.44 3.454 3.545 3.651
Kentucky 3.553 3.541 3.63 3.706
Michigan 3.556 3.572 3.71 3.868
Minnesota 3.545 3.577 3.628 3.726
Nebraska 3.419 3.445 3.505 3.606
Ohio 3.532 3.606 3.762 3.863
Wisconsin 3.526 3.562 3.7 3.791
source EIA

 

 

How do you find the cheapest home heating oil?

Everyone wants to save money. That is an obvious statement. But you would be surprised at how people continue to throw away money on their heating oil bills. Heating costs have been going up over the last few years, what have you done to lower your energy bills?

You would be surprised how many consumers don’t bother to compare home heating oil prices. They just grab the first name out of the phonebook or just stick with their supplier without every really seeing if they are getting the best heating oil prices.

If you are happy with your dealer, that’s great. But you still should check and compare them with other heating oil companies. You may be able to find a lower price.

Now when you do call around and compare prices, just don’t take the lowest quoted price per gallon. Some oil companies will quote a low per gallon price, but will then add on miscellaneous fees for an oil delivery that’s raises the price quite a bit. Always ask if there are additional fees like a delivery charge or a fuel surcharge for the delivery. An ethical oil dealer will be upfront with you with all of their charges.

Be sure to check out the oil supplier with your local Better Business Bureau. They can tell you if there are any complaints about the dealer. This will give you an idea of what type of operation they run.

 

Heating oil prices, which are paid for by consumers, may fluctuate over time by the area that a consumer lives in.  In fact, prices may fluctuate across the country and the world for multiple reasons.  Here are a couple reasons why they may fluctuate.

Demand of Heating Oil:

When prices for crude oil are stabilized, the prices for heating oil in the home may rise slightly in the wintertime because demand is highest.  There are times that costs may rise rapidly to really high levels.  A person who lives in the Northeast might consume 850 to 1,200 gallons of heating oil throughout the winter and use very little for the rest of the year.

Cost Fluctuations for Crude Oil:

Because oil is a large component of the prices of heating oil, the changes in the prices of crude oil can also change the price of heating oil.  International supply and demand also affects the prices of crude oil and the supply is affected in part by the OPEC and several other things.

Competition of Local Markets:

Competition in the free market could also be substantial between an area that only has a few suppliers versus a place with a large number of them.  Rural areas may have higher prices while those in urban areas may have lower prices.

Regional Operating Costs:

The costs are also determined by the higher costs of transporting the products to more remote locations.  In addition to this, the price of doing business through dealers may vary depending on the area where the dealer is stationed.  Wages and salaries, insurance, overhead, lease or rent, equipment, and benefits are also all factors of the cost of doing business.  There also state and local fees.

What Is The Cause of Surges In Heating Oil Prices?

The price of home heating oil may change during a short period of time because if the dealers and consumers have enough oil in storage and if the temperatures fail to drop rapidly, the price might be fairly steady (assuming the price of crude oil do not fluctuate a lot).  However, the quick change to more frigid weather will affect both supply and demand, thus allowing prices to shoot up higher.

This causes the available oil in storage to be used faster than it can be replaced.  The refineries cannot normally keep up with this huge rise in demand during the winter months, thus increasing the prices to provide it.

Up in the Northeast, additional supplies may be imported from long distances, like the Gulf Coast or even European countries.  This makes transportation more expensive and transportation may take up to two or three weeks.  During the time that the resupply from other markets is taking place, the heating oil supply here in America drops down even further and buyers’ anxiety rises in trying to find oil in the short term.  Thus, oil prices rise and sometimes they rise very sharply.

In addition to this, throughout the winter month’s prices of other heating fuels (such as kerosene, propane and other naturally occurring gases) may rise even more than the prices of heating oil.  In this case, some consumers may switch over from using these traditional heating fuels to the heating oil.  Thus, further raising the demand for heating oil.

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New Hampshire Propane Prices for the week ending  January 19, 2015

12/15/2014 3.272
12/22/2014 3.248
12/29/2014 3.246
1/5/2015 3.244
1/12/2015 3.209
1/19/2015 3.231

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